classic (paleo) beef stew.

Want to know how to have an awesome fall? Eat this. All day, everyday.

This is the best classic (paleo) beef stew of all the classic (paleo) beef stews. It rivals  Grandma Eleanor’s Beef Hash–which is one of my all time faves. This is another recipe from Mel Joulwan. If you search my blog you’ll find many of the recipes I use come from her. So check her out. Buy her cookbooks. I own all of them including her latest Well Fed Weeknights–a must for a new working mom like me.

I’ve cut and pasted from her blog again. No adaptations needed. She nails it, really truly. So fire up your stove and get after it.

Ingredients
  • 2 pounds beef stew meat
  • 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder
  • 1/2 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon + 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons cooking fat
  • 1 large onion, finely diced
  • 1 large carrot, minced
  • 1 stalk celery, minced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1 cup red wine (for Whole30, replace with 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar)
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 4 medium potatoes, scrubbed and cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves, coarsely chopped

Directions
1 Pat beef dry with paper towels. In a large bowl, mix arrowroot, 1/2 tablespoon salt, and 1 teaspoon black pepper. Add the beef and toss until coated.
2 Heat a Dutch oven or soup pot over medium-high heat. Add the cooking fat and allow to melt, then add the beef and brown on all sides. Give the meat plenty of breathing room so it forms a nice crust; you might have to cook it in two batches. As it browns, remove the meat to a bowl.
3 When the meat is browned, add the onion, carrot, celery, and garlic to the same pan. (If it’s dry, add another teaspoon or two of cooking fat). Sauté the vegetables until they’re soft and golden, about 10 minutes. Add the tomato paste, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, bay leaves, and thyme. Cook, stirring often, about 2 minutes.
Pour in the wine and broth; stir to combine, then add the beef and accumulated juices to the pot. Cover and simmer 1 hour.
4 Add the potatoes to the pot and simmer another hour, until the meat and potatoes are tender.
5 Simmer uncovered 5-10 minutes to thicken the gravy, then sprinkle with minced parsley before serving.
Get a big spoon and dig in. We ate ours on my Grandma Eleanor’s old harvest tablecloth–a perfect backdrop for this fall favorite.

easy paleo salmon patties.

On Fridays we (sometimes) eat fish. Here’s an easy, healthy recipe for salmon patties–a long-time favorite of ours. My Grandma Eleanor made these for us all the time when we were younger–almost every Friday night during Lent. And my mom carried on the tradition as we got older. I’ve adapted their recipes a little–to make them Paleo and Whole30 compliant. Enjoy.

Grandma Eleanor’s Salmon Patties-Paleo Style

Ingredients–Makes 8 Patties

  • 1 can premium salmon
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 tablespoon fresh dill
  • 2 tablespoon fresh basil
  • 4 tablespoon coconut flour
  • Zest of one lemon
  • Juice of one lemon to taste
  • Coconut oil cooking spray

Drain salmon and dump in a bowl. Use a fork to mash salmon into flakes. Mix in eggs, dill, basil, coconut flour and lemon zest.

imageimage

Use your hands to form mixture into patties. Spray your pan with coconut oil cooking spray and gently place four patties in the pan at a time.

image.jpeg

Fry on medium-high heat until both sides are golden brown.

image.jpeg

Serve with a little squeeze of lemon and a big squeeze of ketchup–Nanny Carol is a fan.

image.jpeg

stream of consciousness. and stream of photos.

Every once in awhile I feel the need to write about nothing at all–to just get some random thoughts out of my head and onto my computer screen. This is one of those days. Plus some pics. So you don’t get bored.

. . .

I fell–hard–on my run Monday. I was running on the road–trying to stay off the icy snow-covered sidewalks–and I tripped on a raised piece of concrete in front of a construction crew pouring the foundation of a new house in our neighborhood. I really crashed and burned. My left knee is so bloody and bruised–and swollen. I’m treating it with my hippie oils, but it’s seriously so gross. If you don’t like blood, guts and gore– scroll really fast past this pic.

Processed with VSCOcam with t1 preset

Bad right? And now I’ll probably never be a teen model.

. . .

When my Grandma Eleanor died last fall I took a package of little fish Dixie cups from her kitchen. She’d pour juice in them for the boys when we’d go visit and they loved drinking anything out of their *real* cups. I remember there were hundreds in the package when I brought them home from her place that day. The boys have been using them for a little drink of water every night before bed.

image.jpeg

Johnny used the last little fish Dixie cup yesterday–and it took my breath away.

. . .

The floor underneath the chairs where my kids eat is disgusting. It’s always covered in little pieces of food–right now it’s fried cauliflower rice from last night–little pieces of fried cauliflower rice are e.v.e.r.y.w.h.e.r.e. I could vacuum every day and night though and that floor would still be disgusting–and I would be worn out. So I just leave it there and clean it all up on Fridays. But I feel like anyone who comes over in the meantime probably frowns upon my housekeeping skills–I’m looking at you mom (and you mother-in-law). Ha.

Processed with VSCOcam with t1 preset

Oh–and they probably frown upon that Christmas tree still hanging out in our hearth room too. Whatever. I can’t help myself–I just really like twinkle lights.

. . .

I took the boys to gymnastics class at CGA this week. It’s the first organized sport we’ve ever attended–and they loved it. Winter days at home with little boys can be rough on a mom–so this was a welcomed excursion. Their coach was incredible and made them both feel so awesome and confident in their newfound tumbling skills. And they both fell asleep in the minivan on the way home–for the win-win-win.

image.jpg

And would you look at these Puma jumpsuits from Nanny Pat? I can’t even.

. . .

And last but not least–Red Velvet Oreos are back. My girlfriend Molly dropped a package in my mailbox Sunday at 2pm–I love her so hard for that. They were *all* gone by 4pm.

image.jpeg

We did eat them with some pears–so I feel good about that mothering. Ha. They are so dang delicious. Go get some now.

. . .

Ok, that’s it for this week’s stream of consciousness. And I feel better. What’s on your mind this week? I’d love to hear all your random thoughts too.

Oh and PS…remember these fly beauties? Want to win them? Yesssssss.

Processed with VSCOcam with t1 preset

They could be yours. Hop on over to Stella and Dot this weekend and place a little order to be entered to win. I’ll announce our winner Monday. Happy Weekend.

easy beef tenderloin. and grandma’s beef hash.

Christmas was good this year.  The out-of-towner side of the family arrived last Monday, so we soaked in a full week of family and fun–and so much food.

My mom made the most beautiful beef tenderloin Christmas Eve. She used my recipe which is really Cheryle Turner’s recipe–which I think is actually Karen Pope’s recipe. I can’t remember who should get the credit–we’ve all been making it a long time.

I love making this beef tenderloin anytime we entertain because it’s delicious and so easy. You really can’t screw it up. Plus it looks fancy. Boom.

image

Fancy Beef Tenderloin

  • 1 Beef Tenderloin
  • Mayonnaise (make your own. it’s so much better.)
  • Garlic Salt
  • Lemon Pepper

Pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees. Coat the tenderloin with mayonnaise. Sprinkle garlic salt and lemon pepper generously all over the top and sides of the meat. Place your tenderloin in a roasting pan or on a cookie sheet (just make sure the cookie sheet has a little lip to catch any drippings). Leave the beef tenderloin uncovered.

Bake at 500 degrees. 15 minutes for rare, 20 minutes for medium-rare, 25 minutes for medium or 30 minutes for well-done. Turn your oven off and leave the tenderloin in the closed oven for one hour. Don’t open your oven!

After an hour, take it out and slice it up. The beef will be so tender, you can cut it with a butter knife. I serve mine with horseradish sauce (sour cream, fresh horseradish and a squeeze of lemon–all mixed to your liking) mashed potatoes, green beans with shallots and mushrooms and some rolls with butter.

Everyone will rave–we all did Christmas Eve. And if you have any left-overs (you probably won’t because it’s that good) you can fry it up with your eggs the next morning.

Or you can make Grandma’s Beef Hash. Keep reading.

. . .

image

My Grandma Eleanor left each of us a little cookbook with all her favorite recipes–which were all our favorite recipes. She was a wonderful cook. And I like to think I get my mad kitchen skills from her.

Her kitchen always smelled like the three sisters–onions, celery and carrots. And her fridge was always bursting with made-from-scratch-goodies–all stored in old Cool Whip containers. She’d scribble the contents on a piece of masking tape and slap it on the lids. When we’d give her a hard time about her recycled storage containers she’d wag her finger at us and tell us she was a child of the depression. And she was–she probably saved thousands not buying any Tupperware over the years.

When we packed my grandparents up for the big move out of their old house, we laughed for an hour in that kitchen about her collection of old, ratty Cool Whip and I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter containers–and those big Prairie Farms Ice Cream buckets we finally threw away.

I miss her all the time–especially during the holidays.

This year, my mom, aunts and I decided to use our leftover Christmas Eve beef tenderloin to make “Angie’s Favorite Beef Hash” from Grandma’s cookbook. Here’s the recipe.

image.jpeg

I love that this entire cookbook was typewritten by her–probably at my Grandpa’s law office while she was supposed to be working. I also love that she mispelled carrots on this particular page (she was a writer  too, so it’s ironic–but it happens to the best of us).

This is the easiest recipe. And a great way to use leftover beef–or leftover beef tenderloin.

image

Throw your leftover chopped beef in a big pot. If you don’t have enough leftover meat juice to cover all the meat, add a beef gravy packet with water. I threw in some grass fed butter too. Because Grandma said to.

image.jpeg

Add your potatoes–make sure you chop them up small so they cook faster.

image

Sauté your onions, celery and carrots in a tablespoon of grass fed butter for a few minutes.

image.jpeg

Throw it all together in your big pot and add some salt and pepper.

image.jpeg

Cover your pot and simmer everything for about 30 minutes–or until your potatoes are soft. The hash should start to thicken up pretty quickly.

image.jpeg

Our hash turned out perfectly–so much flavor from the good beef. And it made my kitchen smell like Grandma’s kitchen always did–that was comforting for all of us who were missing her this year.

We ate it all–but if you make it and have leftovers, just know it freezes beautifully. Especially in an old Cool Whip container. Enjoy.

. . .

This beef tenderloin (as long as you make your own mayo) and this hash (just don’t use that fake gravy packet) are both Whole30 compliant. So if you’re starting a Whole30 next month, add these to your list of recipes to try.